WebCards - Person Sheet
WebCards - Person Sheet
NameLady Elizabeth STEWART Of Durisdeer , F
Birth Dateabt 1387
Birth PlaceDurisdeer, Dumfriesshire, Scotland
Spouses
Birth Dateabt 1380
Birth PlaceScotland
Death Dateabt 1421
Death PlaceFrance
MotherUnnamed , F
Marr Dateabt 1401
Marr PlaceDrumlanrig, Dumfriesshire, Scotland
ChildrenMarion , F (~1402-)
Notes for Lady Elizabeth STEWART Of Durisdeer
This Sir William is said to have married Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of Sir Robert Stewart of Durisdeer.

He certainly did marry a lady named Jean Murray, who died before 12 June 1410, and who is described as his late wife in a Papal dispensation of that date, for his second marriage with Jacoba Douglas, daughter of Sir James Douglas of Dalkeith, and widow of Sir John Hamilton of Cadzow.

William Douglas, second of Drumlanrig, who succeeded, was, so far as recorded, the only son of his precessor.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol VII, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 112-14.
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Notes for William (Spouse 1)
The Earl [James] had also two natural sons and a daughter:

1. William, who had a grant from his father of the lands of Drumlanrig, and who became the ancestor of the Douglases of Drumlanrig, Dukes and Marquesses of Queensberry.

2. Archibald, who received the lands of Cavers from his aunt Isabel, Countess of Mar, some time before 1405. In 1412 King James I confirmed the grant, and Archibald’s descendants still possess the lands.
3. Eleanor, who married sir William Fraser, second of Philorth. They received from her aunt Isabel, Countess of Mar, on 8 December 1404, certain lands in the shire of Banff. From them the Frasers, Lords Saltoun, descend.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol III, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 156-7.
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James, second Earl of Douglas, who was killed at Otterburn, was the direct ancestor of the … Douglases of Drumlanrig and Queensberry. He left no legitimate issue, but his eldest natural son, William Douglas, was the first to hold Drumlanrig, which he received from his father by a charter without date, but granted between 1384 and August 1388. The charter conveyed the whole barony of Drumlanrig, co. Dumfries, to him and his heirs, whom failing, to his brother, Archibald (ancestor of Cavere), and his heirs, and failing the heirs of both, the barony was to revert to the Earl and his heirs, the lands being held for the service of one Knight.

The barony of Drumlanrig had been part of the possessions of the last Earl of the ancient line of Mar, who gave it, probably as a marriage gift, to William, Lord of Douglas, on his union with Margaret of Mar about 1357. This grant is cited in a confirming charter by King David I, dated 13 November [1357]. The superiority of the barony, however, still remained with the representitives of the Earl of Mar, as is indicated by the lands being included in a list of the lands of Sir Malcolm Drummond of Mar placed under protection by the English King on 19 June 1389. The same fact appears from a bond dated 5 December 1389, by which John of Swinton, Lord of Mar, and Margaret, Countess of Douglas and Mar, his wife, bound themselves that they would never question or contest William’s possession of the barony of Drumlanrig, and that he should fully enjoy it in terms of the charter by his father, son of the Countess.

- William Douglas was made a knight befor October 1405, when, as Sir William, he received a safe-conduct to pass through England with twenty horsemen to do feats of arms and star in England until the 1 March following.
- He and other young Douglases travelled to England as hostages for their chief, Archibald, fourth Earl of Douglas, who had been taken prisoner at s
Shrewsbury, and was then in Scotland on parole.
- In 1407 Sir William was again a hostage, but later he was frequently in England, being employed on polital matters between the two countries. Perhaps it was in recognition of his services as a hostage that the Earl of Douglas bestowed on him, some time before 24 October 1407, the whole barony of Hawick, co. Roxburgh.
- In 1411 Sir William, in company with Sir Gavin Dunbar, seized the bridge at Roxburgh and burned the town.


In June 1412 he went with a large following to negotiate for the release of King James I, and though his mission was not successful, he was rewarded by receiving a precept in the King’s own handwriting, specially confirming to him all his possessions in the kingdom of Scotland, the lands of Drumlanrig, Hawick, and Selkirk. This writ is dated at Croydon on 30 November 1412.

In 1415 he was charged, among others, with plundering the royal customs, under the direction of the Earl of Douglas.

Later, Sir William continued his missions to and fro, and, it is said, was in 1417 approached by the Lollard party in England, and was promised a large sum if he stirred up the Scots to invade the southern kingdom, and, according to historians, an abortive foray called the ‘Foul Rail’ was the result.

In 1420 he went to France to interview King James. In 1421 he accompanied the Earls of Wigtoun and Buchan to France to fight on behalf of the Dauphin, and was present at the battle of Baugé on 22 March, when the Scots were victorious. At Fresnay-le-Comte, however, the Scots were worsted, and Drumlanrig lost his banner, which was hung as a trophy in the church of St. Mary at Rouen. It is possible he lost his life also in battle about this time, as in his son’s retour to the barony of Hawick in September 1427, Sir William is said to have been dead for six years.

This Sir William is said to have married Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of Sir Robert Stewart of Durisdeer.

He certainly did marry a lady named Jean Murray, who died before 12 June 1410, and who is described as his late wife in a Papal dispensation of that date, for his

second marriage with Jacoba Douglas, daughter of Sir James Douglas of Dalkeith, and widow of Sir John Hamilton of Cadzow.

William Douglas, second of Drumlanrig, who succeeded, was, so far as recorded, the only son of his precessor.

Source: THE SCOTS PEERAGE, ed. by Sir James Balfour Paul, Vol VII, Edinburgh, 1906, pp. 112-14.
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Sir William Douglas, 1st of Drumlanrig
(died 1427) was the illegitimate son of James Douglas, 2nd Earl of Douglas. He fought against the English in the Hundred Years' War in France, where he was killed in action in 1427.

He married Elizabeth Stewart, daughter of Sir Robert Stewart of Durisdeer,
and had one son,
William Douglas, 2nd of Drumlanrig.

Source: Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Douglas_of_Drumlanrig
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In 1421 Sir William was serving in France with the Earls of Buchand Wigtown in support of the Dauphin, and was present at the battle of Baugé on 21st March, where the English were defeated and the Duke of Clarence slain. But the tables were turned soon after at Fresnay-le-Comte, where Drumlanrig lost his banner, which was hung by the English in the church of St. Mary at Rouen. Here probably, he also lost his life, for in September 1427 he is mentioned in the retour of his son to the barony of Hawick as having been dead for six years.

Sir William married Elizabeth, daughter of Sir Robert Stewart of Durrisdeer, and was succeeded by his son, William, 2nd lord of Drumlanrig, in whose lifetime mention first occurs of the castle of Drumlanrig, probably built by his father.

By an indenture dated 29th May 1429, William Douglas, Lord of Leswalt in Wigtownshire, agreed to deliver the castle of Drumlanrig to William Douglas, Lord of Douglas, which he had held from him for ten years, but retaining for himself the right of use and free entry at all times to the said castle, with many or few, Drumlanrig obtaining similar rights of access to his kinsman’s castle of Lochnaw.

Source: THE DOUGLAS BOOK, by William Fraser, C.B., LL.D, Vol. II, Edinburgh 1885, p. 249.
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Last Modified 29 Dec 2015Created 15 Jan 2018 using Reunion for Macintosh

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